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Springbrook Community Church

The church was becoming very successful in its children’s and youth ministry, but the vision and growth were constrained by facilities. The site was landlocked for growth and its architectural style was constraining its outreach. The leadership wanted to attract the unchurched in the area, so they changed their name (from a mainline denomination) and desired to have a building that was “culturally-neutral”, meaning a public, inviting building that did not look like a conventional church building type. The church wanted an architectural style that was familiar to suburbanites, such as a modern school, cafe, office, or retail structure. In studies together with the leadership, CBC developed a building that is open and inviting, but without the typical trappings of Christian culture.

Springbrook had already experienced success with their children’s curriculum, which was presented in a children’s theater, with recurring characters teaching topical bible lessons. The children sat, sang, and danced along with the performers in front, and the parents sat in back on benches, observing the class and lesson. The parents were able to reinforce the lessons throughout the week, and the whole family was discipled. CBC’s design team created an immersive theater environment that suited the method, and allowed the children to pass through the stage into corridors with decorated classrooms for each age group. The building has been successful and is attracting new children who bring their families.

This congregation also contributed many hours of volunteer participation in painting, interior environments, acoustical panels, and sound system installation. Their savings exceeded $100,000.

"Springbrook had already experienced success with their children’s curriculum, which was presented in a children’s theater, with recurring characters teaching topical bible lessons."